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Globalizing Urban Theory

Starting from anywhere, making connections: globalizing urban theory

Pages 643-657 | Received 15 Nov 2016, Accepted 09 Dec 2016, Published online: 28 Mar 2017

This paper offers a commentary on the papers in this special issue, drawing out the ways in which they bring forward tactics for comparative and global urbanism, contributing to urban theory on the basis of experiences in a range of post-socialist contexts. The paper begins with an analysis of a short story by the South African novelist, Ivan Vladislavič, which provocatively brings post-apartheid and post-socialist contexts into conversation. Inspired by this drawing of lines of connection, the potential for ex-centric and regional studies traditions of urban studies to inform global urban theorising is explored through a reading of the comparative tactics adopted by the papers in this collection – reading practices informed by area studies; thinking with the multiple processes shaping urban outcomes; contributing to the revision and invention of concepts; and extending theory. An invitation, inspired by the scholarship reflected in these papers, is extended for drawing new lines of comparison across a wider range of different urban contexts.

 

Eurasian Geography and Economics 

Volume 57, 2016 – Issue 4-5: Post-Socialist Cities and Urban Theory

 

Ferdowsi Market

Former Iranian Market Ferdowsi – To be Demolished

Ferdowsi Market is located on a small street that is named after the Persian poet, in the heart of Yerevan, near the central Republic Square. At tables placed on the street, beneath poor residential buildings, you can buy a variety of products – from household items to inexpensive clothing.

 

Clothing market is open from 9 untill 6.
The Ferdowsi market is one of the “on a budget” markets of Yerevan.
There are almost 600 outlets in the market.
The seller are afraid of becoming jobless after the demolishing of the market.

During the first years of Armenia’s independence, in the course of the Karabakh war, the country had to endure a heavy transport blockade. In those years, the southern border with Iran became a source of life for Armenia. Trucks with Iranian products were being unloaded directly on the central square, and, by coincidence, were being sold directly on a street with a “Persian” name, Ferdowsi.

In the beginning, traders were mostly Iranians. Then, over time, when they began to bring in goods from other countries, the demand for Iranian goods fell, and they left, and there gradually began to appear Armenian merchants, ” says Lilia, who has worked in the market for around 8 years.

Today, the market offers mostly goods from Turkey and China, and rarely from Iran. According to the traders, the market provides jobs of more than 600 people. Unlike other capital markets, traders are mainly buyers themselves and cannot afford to employ salespeople.

Former Iranian Market Ferdowsi – To Be Demolished

By Gayane Mirzoyan

Ferdowsi Market is located on a small street that is named after the Persian poet, in the heart of Yerevan, near the central Republic Square. At tables placed on the street, beneath poor residential buildings, you can buy a variety of products – from household items to inexpensive clothing.

Clothing market is open from 9 untill 6.

The Ferdowsi market is one of the “on a budget” markets of Yerevan.

There are almost 600 outlets in the market.

The seller are afraid of becoming jobless after the demolishing of the market.

During the first years of Armenia’s independence, in the course of the Karabakh war, the country had to endure a heavy transport blockade. In those years, the southern border with Iran became a source of life for Armenia. Trucks with Iranian products were being unloaded directly on the central square, and, by coincidence, were being sold directly on a street with a “Persian” name, Ferdowsi.

In the beginning, traders were mostly Iranians. Then, over time, when they began to bring in goods from other countries, the demand for Iranian goods fell, and they left, and there gradually began to appear Armenian merchants, ” says Lilia, who has worked in the market for around 8 years.

Today, the market offers mostly goods from Turkey and China, and rarely from Iran. According to the traders, the market provides jobs of more than 600 people. Unlike other capital markets, traders are mainly buyers themselves and cannot afford to employ salespeople.

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